Jess

Who you gonna call? No, not quite…

Venge of Lansing

Remember that time you were wakened from a deep slumber with a fear in your heart so deep you could swear you were about to meet your imminent doom? I know you do, because it’s happened to all of us. Is there someone watching me? Is someone out there? Am I being followed? You might be. But it might not be in the way we tend to think. As you see, or prepare to see The Avengers (you’re not fooling me, I you know you’re going to see it), turn your thoughts to those in the world that creep about… but in pursuit of good. People like Lansing’s own superhero: Venge. Continue reading

Khalid

Love through the Ages

Christina is a dear friend of mine and she just sent me a text message saying:

I just asked a boy to prom and he said ‘YES’

In case you don’t already know me, I am not a 15 year old high school student and neither is Christina. However, there is going to be a prom for adults in Lansing on May 19th and every one is abuzz about who they are taking and how they are going to ask them. I am using every ounce of energy not to share some really good ideas people have.

As for Christina, it is a beautiful coincidence that the prom on May 19th is exactly 10 years and 1 day after her high school prom. To this day, she wished that she had the guts to ask her high school sweetheart (now husband) to prom when she was in high school. In a flurry of excitement she was giddy to ask him now that they are married, regardless of the fact that it is 10 years later. Just wait till you see what she will be wearing!

 

 

Let me back up a little bit and give you a little background on “Love through the Ages: A Prom for Adults“. Continue reading

Lisa

Cat Like Reflexes

I never dreamed that I would be a morning person. Juggling an obnoxious schedule forced me to broaden my day to fit in everything that I had to do, resulting in early morning start times. I choose to walk my dog Henslee in the wee hours of the morning (some would consider it to still be nighttime) because it feels like the only consistent part of the day and is critical to both of our well beings.

Sir Henslee

It became my favorite time and ritual of the day. My arch-nemesis is still my alarm clock but I find that my most honest, creative and interesting thoughts happen when I am well rested with the freedom to day dream. As the day goes on, I develop narcoleptic tendencies making problem solving more difficult and easier to procrastinate. Without traffic and congestion, Henslee can sniff and play in the park without bothering anybody and and the city feels very simple, calm and completely mine. Continue reading

Ken

Starfarm: A Lansing Staple for a Decade

In most of life’s venues, dressing up in solid-color Adidas jump suits, donning a pair of cheesy sunglasses and rocking out to 80s music is completely unacceptable behavior. Unless, of course, you’re actually in the 80s.

But you’re not.

You’re in the 10s… or something like that.

Starfarm at their most serious.

If you’re in central Michigan, however, there is one caveat to the rule. You could just be enjoying one of the region’s most popular tickets, Starfarm. Decked out in fabulously hideous clothing from a period in style most would rather be forgotten, the musical group performs the hits that won’t ever be. I myself have been known to hit the dance floor while screaming the chorus of many a Journey song expertly rendered by the local group.

For more than a decade, the core group of instrumentalists has built quite the following in mid-Michigan. Dana Mirate (drums), Sean Mirate (keyboards), Ryan Tarrant (bass) and “Slammin’ Danny” (guitar) have been together since 2001. And though the role of lead singer has had its instabilities, the group has hit solid ground through the vibrant vocals of Whitney Spotts for the past three years.

Having been members of the Lansing community for so long – all currently live in the greater Lansing area and most have been residents for more than 10 years – Starfarm has seen many changes in the city throughout the years.

If you ask Dana Mirate about the changes in the music scene specifically, he’ll quickly launch into a comparison of the past decade to the early 90s when he first arrived in East Lansing. As a music major at MSU, Dana was involved in the music scene from the word go.

“Everywhere you went, there were a lot of bars and clubs where you could play,” he recalls. “More people were writing original music and you could actually play that at bars. You could be an all-original band and play just one cover.”

Dana from Starfarm, who was gracious enough to sit and chat before a show at The Green Door.

Ryan Tarrant, though, is quick to point out that most all of Starfarm’s members still work on original music on the side, writing and recording songs. They just lament the loss of many quality establishments willing to push original bands.

But if you are looking for some original acts, they suggest checking out Mac’s Bar on East Michigan Avenue. They also identify The Green Door, Rick’s American Café, Lou & Harry’s Sports Bar, Dublin Square, Harper’s and The Exchange as decent places to catch live music in the area. Both agree that none of those, however, have a good house sound system or a good sound technician that really knows the space and how to make a band sounds good.

Which is why Dana makes me promise to mention Starfarm’s sound guy, John Miller, who is, “worth his weight in gold.”

For them, it’s something that Lansing is still in need of, even though they see a lot of positive changes happening downtown.

“The downtown has gone through a lot of changes,” says Ryan. “There didn’t used to be anything down there just six or seven years ago. When the Capital closed down, when the state workers weren’t there, they just rolled up the sidewalks and every single thing was closed. But now you can go down there and there are cool places to eat, there’s a lot of different bars to go to and you can get a lot of different vibes. “

Ryan of Starfarm fame, who was also nice enough to sit and chat before a show. And also nice enough to get me a beer.

“I like it,” adds Dana.

Take, for example, the outdoor Octoberfest music festival that downtown bars banded together to put on last Fall. Starfarm was ready to rock out Washington Street in a giant block party, if only Mother Nature had cooperated. The skies would not stop pouring rain and the temperatures dropped, making it unlikely to pull off the show.

“It was a shame,” says Dana. “It could have been very cool.”

One event that they did manage to pull off this year, however, was a rocking 80s party fundraiser for REACH Art Studio Center, put on by the Capital Area Women’s Lifestyle Magazine. You may remember hearing about it from our own Anika Fassia, who attended with some friends who came to town from Chicago to see what Lansing was all about.

“They go all-out decorating it,” Dana says, noting that it was the second time Starfarm had played the fundraiser and that they already had been booked for next year. “It’s top notch. I’d recommend it. It includes food, all these great party favors, candy from the 80s. You mingle with some pretty important people and, I think it’s cool.”

“And it’s fun,” chimes in Ryan, repeating the mantra of this very blog. “There’s a lot of really cool people, a lot of young professionals, who want to come out and have a good time for a charity.”

After talking to the pair for some time, it becomes obvious that, yes, Lansing has a long way to go. It’s tough to make a living as a musician in the area, getting paid little to nothing for years of tuition, practice and investments into equipment. Working a day job while being gone every single weekend performing is difficult, especially for those in the band with kids.

But there is still plenty to celebrate and use as a springboard into the future.

Starfarm at their finest.

“There’s some great stuff that you can see for free even sometimes like at the Wharton Center,” agrees Ryan.

“I remember once when Branford Marsalis was at the Creole Gallery down here and they just went out and did a show,” continues Ryan. “One of the top jazz musicians in the entire country just kind of on the down-low went in and did a show. You’re just walking down the street and you’re like, ‘Is that Marsalis playing here? That’s pretty cool’”

“Rodney Whitaker teaches jazz at MSU and is one of the most sought after bass players for jazz,” says Dana, chiming in. “And he brings in these cats. He brings in Wynton Marsalis and Branford Marsalis. And that’s here. You won’t see that in Iowa. You’ll see it in Chicago, but you’ll pay a lot of money.

“I’ll tell you right now, every city you go to sucks to the people who are there all the time. There’s a level of suckiness in every single city; but it’s what you make of it. It’s about the community and the effort you put into it.”

Shannon

There IS film in Lansing! And some of it is directed by women!

I had the rare opportunity to view the line up of films from the Directing Workshop for
Women (DWW) Showcase for this year’s Capital City Film Festival over the last few weeks and saying that I was impressed is an understatement.

According to the Celluloid Ceiling 2007 Report, women accounted for only 6% of directors of the top 250 domestic grossing films released in 2007, a decline of 1% since 2006. This figure is approximately half the percentage of women directors working in 2000 when women accounted for 11% of all directors. While these statistics are dated by a few years, it is apparent that the role of women as directors is on the decline. Women in roles of leadership in general are scarce; just look to the role of women in U.S. Congress for example, where they hold approximately 17% of the elected seats, according to the Center for Women in Politics, yet make up about 51% of the United States population as of the 2010 U.S. Census. It is obvious that women are underrepresented, but what can be done about it? In my opinion the first step is to support the women who do take on leadership roles. Continue reading